Do You Love the Look of Copper? Try Rose Gold

Bright and warm, rose gold adds a soft touch to any room


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By Jess McBride, Houzz

If you’re a fan of warm metal tones such as brass, bronze and especially copper, rose gold might be the right look for you. It introduces more than just a metallic sheen to your decor — its pinkish hue adds a soft touch that works equally well in modern and traditional settings. Here are a few of the ways you can introduce rose gold into your home.


Related: How to Decorate With Mixed Metals


First, what is rose gold? Copper could easily be confused for rose gold. Another warm-toned metal, copper happens to be the substance that makes rose gold appear, well, rosy. Pure gold ore emerges from the ground a brassy yellow, but it rarely makes its way into jewelry cases or fixtures in that form. It’s simply too malleable and soft to be of much functional use, even for jewelry. Most gold products are actually alloys, mixtures of metals whose chemical and structural properties reinforce one another and add strength and durability. Rose gold is an alloy containing a little silver and a lot of copper.

 

Fresh Photo House, original photo on Houzz

Pair it with other metals. Because rose gold contains gold as its base metal, it forms an attractive alliance with golds and metallics of other hues. Here, we see rose-gold-colored bar stools across the aisle from a truer gold tabletop. Both are balanced by a canvas of white and sunlight so that their metallic sheen is the driving force of the space.

 

Pair it with cooler shades. Setting rose gold against a backdrop of gray keeps its pinkiness in check. And limiting it to small accent pieces like pillows and bowls means you won’t be locked in to the look if you tire of it.

 

Godfrey Hirst, original photo on Houzz

Pop it against a black backdrop. Rose gold touches brighten up this darker color scheme. All the accents are strictly rose gold, which helps to reinforce the minimalist aesthetic while adding plenty of warmth to counterbalance the stark black and white.

 

Perth Style Co., original photo on Houzz

Combine it with wood. The beauty of rose gold is that it also coordinates nicely with wood tones — in fact, almost any wood tone will do. When pairing the two, keep the rest of the decor light and toward the cooler end of the spectrum, for reasons already mentioned (notably, balance.) Especially appealing about this space, at least to a flower lover like me, is the way the pink blooms draw out the daintiness of the rose gold accent tables.

 

The Couture Rooms, original photo on Houzz

Sophisticated bling. Rose gold is potent stuff in decor, as are sequins; put them together and you’ve got an exercise in dramatic restraint. Here, a rose gold pillow is judiciously placed amid an otherwise monochromatic Champagne-inspired bedroom. It’s just enough, gracefully stopping short of too much.


Related: Balance Metallic Bedding With Neutral Lamp Shades


Country Dining Room, original photo on Houzz

Match it with metallic wallpaper. As perfectly placed as this rose gold chandelier is, it’s really the metallic wallpaper that steals the show. The look is a reminder to think beyond true metal finishes and ask where else you might sneak a little metallic shimmer into an unexpected place.

 

 

Tara Seawright Interior Design, original photo on Houzz

Break the rules. And finally, here’s an exception to the rule of using rose gold to accent cooler color palettes. This whole bedroom breathes luxury and glamour and is awash in nonmetallic shades of rose gold. Look to Farrow & Ball’s Calamine Pink or Middleton Pink for inspiration.

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