3 Lovely Picnic Spots in the Hudson Valley; PLUS: 8 Tips For Packing Lunch

Whether you want to eat an elegant meal outdoors or just a snack, there’s nothing like an old-fashioned picnic to help you savor the beauty and bounty of the Hudson Valley


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After a spectacularly cold and snowy winter, spring has finally sprung and it’s time to reestablish your connection with the wonderful world outside your home. And there’s no better way to do it than dining al fresco. We’ve scoured the Hudson Valley to bring you these three perfect picnics in some of the region’s most beautiful spots with some of the Hudson Valley’s tastiest homegrown fare.

Before you set out, we’ve got a few suggestions to help ensure that your picnic goes off without a hitch.

  • Bring a blanket that’s big enough for everyone to sit on and make sure it’s one that you don’t mind getting dirty. Don’t forget sunscreen, sunglasses, hats, and bug spray. And wet wipes!
  • Don’t overpack — you’ll have to carry it both ways.
  • Don’t bring sticky, delicate, or spoil-danger foods, like egg salad and tuna salad (anything with mayo should be avoided). Fruit and lettuce salads also tend to wilt and brown, making them unappealing. Pasta with pesto or a nice hearty farro or quinoa salad is a much better choice. If you want a green salad, use kale, which is much heartier than lettuce and can stand up to a little time and heat.
  • Don’t bother packing sandwiches that will just get soggy. Instead, bring a baguette and good cheese or salami with you, and put your sandwiches together when it’s time to eat.
  • Finger foods are a must, especially if your party includes kids. Carrot sticks, dried fruit, nuts, popcorn, cookies...
  • Freeze water or juice in water bottles (don’t overfill — liquids expand as they freeze!) — they’ll help keep your food cold and will melt as you drive or walk to your picnic spot.
  • If frozen bottles of juice and water won’t cut it for your cooling needs, use a freezer pack rather than ice, which is unsanitary and melts all over everything. Wrap freezer packs in sandwich bags to prevent soaking anything.
  • Carry your things in a tote bag or backpack — although they’re picturesque, hampers are hard to carry and you may want to do some exploring afterwards.
saugerties lighthouse

Picnic #1: The Saugerties Lighthouse

Family fun in Ulster County

Park your car in the lot just past the U.S. Coast Guard’s station on Lighthouse Drive and set off for an easy, half-mile walk over sandy areas, stretches of regular ground, and wooden boardwalks that span the many swampy areas and streams alongside the mighty Hudson. Between the birds, the river, and curiosities like the strangely beautiful, spiky, black water chestnuts that wash up along the shore, there’s plenty to see along the way, but the best is definitely last: the trail ends in tall reeds at the picturesque, red brick lighthouse. Built in 1869, the light is still in use and the building now serves as a bed and breakfast — there’s a long waiting list for one of its two bedrooms. Stroll past the lighthouse and across a short, narrow, wooden bridge to a series of wooden decks overlooking the Hudson. You’ll find several large picnic tables; a large mulberry tree, which produces tons of sweet berries in season; and a killer view of the Hudson River. Kids love watching the Amtrak trains go past on the opposite bank, tracking the river traffic, and climbing down the two sets of wooden stairs to wade in the water and throw rocks. There are no garbage bins, so be prepared to carry any trash back out with you.

Where you’re going: Saugerties Lighthouse, 168 Lighthouse Dr., Saugerties

When you’re going: The walk is beautiful in all weather, but be sure to check the tides as portions of the trail are underwater at certain times.

What you’re eating: Because this is such a great destination for families with young kids, we’ve carefully selected a menu designed to appeal to the Hudson Valley’s pickiest eaters.

camembert jacuterie

Picnic #2: The Vanderbilt Mansion

A romantic rendezvous in Dutchess County

Step back into the Gilded Age at the summer home of Fredrick and Louise Vanderbilt (it may be hard to believe, but it’s downright small in comparison to the palatial homes built by his relatives in Newport and Asheville.) The expansive, beautifully manicured lawns offer ample places to picnic. When you’re done enjoying your meal, you can stroll through the magical Italian gardens or put your picnic stuff back in the car and do the moderate 2.5 mile loop hike with beautiful views of the Hudson River. Or, if you’re interested, you can pay $10 (free for children 15 and under) to tour the mansion — the guides are excellent.

Where you’re going: Vanderbilt Mansion, 119 Vanderbilt Park Rd., Hyde Park

When you’re going: The grounds are free and open every day from sunrise to sunset. Tours are offered on the hour from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

What you’re eating: Savor the luxury of the romantic surroundings while you enjoy a sumptuous old world-inspired picnic.

bear mountain

Picnic #3: Bear Mountain State Park

A hearty Italian feast

Park in one of the lots — at $8 per vehicle, parking is one of the only things that is not free about the experience — and head down to Hessian Lake where you can eat your picnic and enjoy the views. You can also rent a boat and walk around the entire lake. Head back up the trail to check out the merry-go-round and the Trailside Zoo — home to a wide range of native species including coyotes, bald eagles, foxes, beavers, and black bears that have been either injured or orphaned; those that can make it are returned to the wild once they’re well. Admission is a suggested donation of $1.

If you’ve got energy to burn and are in good shape, try the four-mile loop hike that begins on the Major Welch trail and takes you over some fairly challenging terrain (including areas of rock scrambling — the hike is not recommended for children) up to Perkins Memorial Tower at the top of the mountain. You can catch your breath there while you gawk at the 360-degree view that stretches as far as the NYC skyline. When you’re ready to head down, you do so via a shorter, gentler trail that is actually part of the Appalachian Trail. Or, if you’re too tired to try this roughly three-hour hike, you can also drive to the top to experience the views.

biscotti

Where you’re going: Bear Mountain State Park, 55 Hessian Dr., Bear Mountain

When you’re going: Start early and plan to spend the whole day. If possible, visit during the week — the park tends to get very crowded on weekends.

What you’re eating: There’s a whole lot to do at Bear Mountain so this picnic is meant to fulfill hearty appetites. But it can also go a couple of ways — you can assemble individual pasta salads or treat it as more of a mezze, tearing off chunks of the focaccia to dip in the pesto and making little sandwiches with the delicious mozzarella and the sun dried tomatoes. Since the theme is Italian, these fantastic biscotti above make a fitting finish to the meal.

  • A tub of basil pesto from Buddhapesto in Bearsville
  • A container of mozarellini from Falanga’s in Poughkeepsie
  • A big tupperware of lemon pepper pasta from La Bella Pasta in Kingston
  • Sun-dried tomatoes from Four Winds Farm in Gardiner
  • A loaf of olive oil and basil focaccia from Deisings Bakery in Kingston
  • A bag of chocolate almond biscotti from the Hudson Valley Dessert Company in Saugerties
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