What’s Hot in Kitchen Trends?

Forecasts for the heart of the home.


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“Kitchens tend to be open these days, and the uses of metals — be it in the cabinets or accessories — are just as important a part of the overall design as is the cabinetry. In some instances, you may see different metals combined to accentuate the environment or perhaps even metallic railings, structural beams, or other design elements being intentionally brought into view of the traditional kitchen area. Depending on building architecture and period, the options are boundless.”

— Matthew Wilhelm, Owner of EKB Kitchens & Interiors, New Windsor

 

“The most notable trend is the choice in countertop materials. Many people are going to quartz composite, or what some companies call engineered stone, comprised of 90–94 percent quartz; the rest is a resin base that holds it all together. The advantage to this material is it’s nonporous and you don’t have to maintain it, plus it’s harder than granite. It’s been on the market for a long while, but there have been great strides to make it look more like natural stone. For traditional designs, clients are leaning toward the marbleized version; for a more modern design, they’re going with solid and monochromatic.”

— James Bruyn, Owner of Hudson Valley Kitchen Design and Bruyn Design, New Hampton

 

“Something that is really trending is Shaker cabinets painted white, around the perimeter of the kitchen, and an island painted gray with a white countertop. This is a trend that started in Europe 20 years ago, and we’re jumping on the bandwagon. It has usurped the market in half the kitchens we design. A trend I would like to see take off is taking a step away from the working triangle of a kitchen and thinking more about furniture pieces. You have a buffet for your sink and dishwasher, an armoire for your refrigeration, then you have a work table, that’s the island. And if we start thinking of these individual pieces, that steers us in a better direction for doing other accent colors.” 

— Sam Hofferbert, Designer, Rhinebeck Kitchen and Bath, Rhinebeck

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