Fall Getaways 2015

The Adirondacks

A six-million-acre playground (with some 3,000 lakes) for wilderness junkies


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Great Camp Sagamore was purchased by Alfred G. Vanderbilt in 1901

THE VIBE:
The Adirondacks have been a stomping ground for many groups: Gilded Age robber barons; Olympians; outdoorsmen; and vacationers. And, as the largest protected area in the contiguous United States, the six-million-acre Adirondack Park (2.6 million acres of which are owned by New York State) has plenty of space to go around. Swathed across it all is breathtaking scenery — mountains touching water touching pristine forest. And, thanks to strict environmental protection laws, the Adirondacks are still largely wild, all the better for a genuinely tranquil escape or outdoor adventure.

In the late 1800s, when socialites traveled to the Adirondacks by train and steamboat, William West Durant, the son of a railroad tycoon, had a vision to turn the region into a vacation destination for the rich. It’s a good thing he failed: If he hadn’t, Adirondack Park might not be the preserved wilderness sanctuary that it is today.

dinner cruise
Take a dinner cruise run by Raquette Lake Navigation Company in Hamilton County

It’s not entirely wilderness, of course. There are pockets of civilization, like Lake Placid, Saranac Lake, and Schroon Lake, which together offer plenty of accommodations and dining options for tourists, while also serving as access points to the mountains for hiking and biking.

The center of tourism is Lake Placid, site of the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics (the “Miracle on Ice” game against the Soviet Union happened here). Lake Placid draws people in with its charming downtown and countless recreational activities, and it’s part of the High Peaks region, so it’s an ideal base for a hiker who strives to be a “46er” — someone who has climbed all 46 of the Adirondack High Peaks (4,000-plus feet).

During the Gilded Age, magnates like Vanderbilt and J.P. Morgan retreated to Raquette Lake in Hamilton County. Channel the old-world grandeur by hopping on a dinner cruise run by Raquette Lake Navigation Company, or visit Great Camp Sagamore, the Vanderbilts’ wilderness estate and the prototype of Adirondack-style architecture.

mirror lake
There should be no question as to how Mirror Lake, just south of Lake Placid, got its name

WHERE TO STAY:

Mirror Lake Inn Resort & Spa

77 Mirror Lake Dr., Lake Placid, New York
518-523-2544; www.mirrorlakeinn.com
Packages begin at $259/night

If you want luxury during your Adirondack escape, the Mirror Lake Inn has you covered. Travel + Leisure named it to its 2015 list of the world’s top 500 hotels, and for good reason: The 131-room resort is located steps away from Lake Placid’s downtown and picturesque Mirror Lake. The inn’s rooms offer lake views, and if you can drag yourself away from the vista, the resort has two pools, complimentary boats, and a private beach. Otherwise, take time to relax at the award-winning spa or indulge at one of three on-site dining options. (One, The View, is Lake Placid’s only Four-Diamond restaurant — and, according to the wait staff, there’s a proposal “every night.”)

The Hedges

1 Hedges Rd., Blue Mountain Lake, New York
518-352-7325; www.thehedges.com
Rates begin at $245/night

The Hedges is an exercise in tranquility — old wooden, historical lodges (this site has been a vacation spot for more than 100 years) scattered across 12.5 acres along the shore of Blue Mountain Lake in the central portion of the Adirondacks. Spend your days lounging by the lake or out on the water in one of the resort’s kayaks or canoes. Breakfast and dinner are included with your stay, and the meals don’t disappoint (order the buttery grits at breakfast). For couples, The Hedges has rooms in a few adults-only lodges. For a more private experience, or if you are going with the family, stand-alone one-, two-, three-, and four-bedroom cabins are available. It’s a friendly place filled with repeat faces — many guests come back every year, unable to resist the resort’s charm.

The Adirondack Inn

1051 Rte. 9, Schroon Lake, New York
518-743-1665; www.theadirondackinn.com
Rates begin at $109/night

Renovated in 2014, the Adirondack Inn combines the best of outdoorsy charm and modern amenities. Rooms are dressed up in Adirondack-style décor, so you won’t forget you’re in the mountains, but a flat-screen TV and updated bathroom are welcome conveniences. What the Adirondack Inn is about is location — stay here to be within walking distance to Schroon Lake’s beaches and downtown. Plus, Schroon Lake is just off I-87, 30 minutes north of Lake George, so it’s one of the closest points to the Hudson Valley in the Adirondacks.

AT A GLANCE:

  • Distance from Poughkeepsie: 3 hours and 20 minutes to Lake Placid
  • Location: the Adirondacks cover 6 million acres in northeastern New York State
  • Population: 137,000
  • Highest peak: Mount Marcy (5,343 ft.) in Essex County, the highest point in New York State
  • Best known for: the 46 High Peaks, the number of mountains in the region higher than 4,000 feet; the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics; Great Camps of the Gilded Age, the former estates of robber barons and icons of Adirondack architecture
tucker farm

DON’T MISS:
If you have the kids in tow, they’ll be sure to enjoy the corn maze at Tucker Farms in Gabriels (in Franklin County), which is so big it can take up to a few hours to complete.

FALL FOLIAGE ALERT:
The best time to view fall foliage is late September through early October. Take a drive on Route 30 between Speculator and Indian Lake for some of the most spectacular views in the region. Blue Mountain Boat Livery offers daily historical boat tours where you can learn about the region while you appreciate the views. Or go for a ride on the Adirondack Scenic Railroad’s Fall Foliage Train, which runs between September 12 and October 11.

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