A Dane In the Valley

Walking Through the City: The New York High Line Versus the Walkway

Our Danish intern marches through the City in 90-degree weather, and learned a thing or two about the New York City High Line


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Murals spotted from the High Line

The Big Apple, Empire State, the City that Never Sleeps — it has many names. But you all know what I’m talking about: New York City, baby!

Last weekend I decided to explore the City on foot. In my opinion, the concrete jungle is best experienced on your feet than in a dungy subway full of tourists unfolding their maps in your face (I’m talking from experience!).

My friend and I (hi, Don!) walked over 60 blocks from Port Authority to SoHo in the suffocating heat. We were dripping with sweat, and my feet were killing me. I would still do it again in a heartbeat though!

Our journey started at the New York City High Line in the Meatpacking District. The High Line is a public park elevated above the streets and runs from 34th Street to 14th Street. It used to be a freight rail line, but today it’s a bustling oasis in the heart of Manhattan.

I learned that the last train ran in 1980, but in 1999, Friends of the High Line (residents from the neighborhood) advocated for its preservation. The effort bore fruit, and in 2002 they started negotiating the framework. The park finally opened to the public in 2009. Today, it’s owned by the City of New York and sorely operated and maintained by Friends of the High Line.

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Old architecture and Chelsea Market

When I walked down the High Line, I couldn’t help comparing it to my recent stroll on the Walkway in Poughkeepsie. Both places share similar stories — they were both freight trail lines in the past — and are scenic in their own ways.

The Walkway has a breathtaking view over the Hudson River and the town of Poughkeepsie, and the High Line provides pedestrians with a nice view over the City’s old buildings in ultra-chic Chelsea — and the Hudson River, too!

If you’re into an urban jungle kind-of-feel and being surrounded by beautifully well-kept flowers and plants, the High Line is definitely worth a visit. But if serenity is all you need, the Walkway is the place to be.

At the end of the High Line, we took the stairs down and went to Chelsea Market, where we munched on some fresh fruit and looked at the many food shops. We continued through Greenwich Village and busy SoHo and ended the day with a visit to the very sentimental 9/11 Memorial. A beautiful ending to a beautiful day! 

Have any questions or recommendations for Anemone? Suggest them as a comment below!

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