Winter Fun Guide

Winter Storm Juno, "Historic" Blizzard, to Hit Northeast

Are you prepared for winter storm Juno? Here are some details — and safety tips


Published:

A man operating a snowblower in Ossining, N.Y. on Saturday, Jan. 24, 2014 during Winter Storm Iola

Photograph courtesy of Weather.com/Kevin Hayes

With Hudson Valley Weather and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration calling for more than 24 to 30 inches of snow across the Hudson Valley, Westchester, and Berkshires on Monday, winter storm “Juno” — dubbed “potentially historic” by the Weather Channel — is sure to cause power outages and severe damage over the course of its two-day run.

Hudson Valley residents are no strangers to storms of this nature. However, caution should be taken when preparing for winter storms. Here are some safety tips courtesy of NOAA’s National Weather Service:

  • Arm yourself with an Emergency Preparedness Kit containing three days’ worth of food, water, medications, and supplies, including spare batteries and a battery-operated radio.
  • Keep your cell phone charged in case of emergencies.
  • Stay off the roads as much as possible. Should the need to travel arise, keep blankets, water, and snacks in your car in the event that you become stuck.
  • Wear warm layers and cover exposed skin to help prevent frostbite.
  • Bring Fido inside!
  • Never use generators or kerosene heaters indoors. Read about carbon monoxide safety here.
  • We all know to use proper form — power through your legs, not your back — when shoveling heavy snow. Take frequent breaks, stay hydrated, and avoid downed power lines.
  • Remember to check on your neighbors, especially the elderly, in case they need help clearing their walkways and driveways.

Read the full list of the National Weather Service’s winter safety tips here.


Related: Shoveling Snow Can Cause Heart Attacks


Some of our own tips:

  • When driving: steer clear of snow plows, emergency responders, and other vehicles.
  • Don’t be reckless. Although you may think your vehicle is in top condition (we’re looking at you, bold SUV-drivers), you never know how much experience other drivers have with snow and ice — or how well they can handle their vehicles. Don’t cause an accident by speeding, weaving through lanes, or tailgating. 
  • Drive as slow as you need to. Keep your headlights and hazards on to alert other drivers that you’re there, especially when visibility is poor. 
  • As always, comply with authorities and stay off the roads as much as possible.
  • Keep an eye out for flooding, especially at lower elevations, due to melting snow.
  • Keep children away from snowbanks and the road. Passing snow plows and drivers cannot see children playing in the snow.
  • If you lose power, keep the refrigerator door closed to help preserve your food. Consider moving perishables to the freezer.
  • Block cold air from sneaking into the house by sealing cracks with old blankets or towels.
  • Play card games, board games, or read Hudson Valley Magazine to pass the time until the power returns.

Related: How to Shovel Snow Like a Boss


Remember: a winter storm is a severe weather event. Stay tuned to the National Weather Service for additional alerts. Did we miss any safety tips? Share your own in the comments below. Be safe, Hudson Valley!

Edit Module
 
Edit ModuleShow Tags
 
Edit Module
Edit Module