Your Guide to Bridal Bouquets

Choose flowers that suit your taste, and your budget.


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Yevhenii Kukulka/fotolia

Like brides, bouquets come in all shapes and sizes. The “rules” for choosing a bridal bouquet have loosened quite a bit in recent years, with brides carrying everything from large cascades to humble sunflowers tied with a simple ribbon. Though it’s important to choose flowers that suit your taste and your budget, you should know how to “speak the language” when you visit florists for consultations or estimates. Here’s a quick crash course in bridal bouquet styles.

 

Hand- Tied

A favorite among Bohemian brides, this loosely arranged bouquet is tied with ribbon by the stems. This style is ideal for outdoor venues or in rustic environments, for a more casual feeling.

“Most flowers work with this type of design because this type of bouquet does not have a specific shape. Some flowers that are typically chosen for this type of bouquet are sunflowers, iris, hydrangea, wildflowers, tulips, roses, gerbera, calla lilies, ranunculus and peonies.” ~ Angela Trippe-Barbero, Owner, Angel Wedding Works

 

Pageant

Known for long stems, these bouquets are cradled in a bride’s arms with the foliage resting by her elbow. This style bouquet is popular for more modern weddings.

“One of the most popular flowers used for pageant bouquets are calla lilies but you can definitely get creative and use other long stemmed flowers and greens to give it a unique look.” ~ Nelmary Lipinski, Head Designer & Owner, Earthy Elegance Florals

 

Round

This traditional and elegant bouquet is a tight cluster arrangement that works well with any wedding and dress styles.

Flowers that work well in these bouquets include: roses and peonies. Often, round bouquets feature just one flower, but different flowers can be combined for color and variety.

 

Nosegay 

Formally known as “tussie mussie,” these bouquets often contain more greenery than flowers. The stems are cut to a uniform length and then are held together by ribbon.

Flowers that work well in these bouquets are, “round type of flowers such as roses, calla lilies, hydrangeas, tulips, disbuds, daisies, sweet peas, and carnations.” ~Angela Trippe-Barbero, Owner, Angel Wedding Works

 

Cascade

A waterfall-like effect, these blooms spill over the bride’s hand and get narrower as it flows downward.

Flowers that work well in these bouquets include: orchids and lilies, larger blooms that are open or slightly elongated. Baby's breath, vines, and greenery can be added to accentuate the cascading effect.

 

Composite

Although it is often not requested, this bouquet is a lovely choice. “A single rose is often placed at the center and rose petals are glued all the way around. It gives the impression that you are holding an enormous rose.” This bouquet is wired together on a single stem that is wrapped in ribbon for a finishing touch.

“Orchids and Asiatic lilies are also popularly used to create this distinguished look.” ~ Nelmary Lipinski, Head Designer & Owner, Earthy Elegance Florals

 

Posy

Light enough to be held in one hand, this bouquet style is small enough to avoid taking away attention from a bride’s gown, but still be noticeable.

Flowers that work well in these bouquets include: roses, peonies, ranuculus, baby's breath, lily of the valley — even succulent. Posy bouquets are usually on the daintier side, so the flowers included should not overwhelm. Augment with greenery or dried lavender. 

 

 

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